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TRASH TALK

SENIOR CAPSTONE COLLECTION | 2024

An upcycled collection that challenges traditional models within the textile industry. Trash Talk highlights the future of textile waste, revealing its potential for repurposing and storytelling. Each garment tells its own narrative, before being transformed into pieces that can be disassembled and reassembled time and time again.

WHERE IT STARTED

Trash Talk originated while exploring catalogs and magazines in the Outdoor Archive at Utah State University. Driven by a deep concern for the environmental impact of the textile industry. 

 

By diving into design history, I searched for timeless styles, seeking practical inspiration for an upcycled collection. The urgent waste issue in the industry became an undeniable reality, prompting the opportunity to blend my passions of design and sustainability.

Each piece in the collection aims to reintroduce timeless styles and durable construction techniques, with the overarching goal to challenge traditional models within the textile industry while encouraging a more thoughtful approach to design. 

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(Outdoor Archive, Utah State University)

LET'S TALK TRASH

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The textile industry is the second biggest polluter in the world

Most apparel items are made with materials that will not biodegrade for up to 200 years. 

Recycling fibers require a lot of energy and is labor intensive. 

Over 100 billion garments produced annually. Three out of every five ending up in the landfill. 

WE AS HUMANS HAVE TO WEAR CLOTHES. CLOTHING PRODUCTION IS NOT GOING TO STOP ANYTIME SOON. 

CURRENT BARRIERS

BRANDS LACKING TRANSPARENCY
Consumers face lack of information from brands, leaving them with uncertainty 

INTENTION VS. ACTION
75% of consumers intend to support value-aligned brands, but only 25% follow through.

A RACE AGAINST RESOURCE DEPLETION
By 2030 the textile industry will use two Earth’s worth of resources. With the demand for clothing increasing by 63%.

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HOW MIGHT WE EMPOWER CONSUMERS TO MAKE SUSTAINABLE APPAREL CHOICES, WHILE ADDRESSING THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES PRESENTED BY THE RAPID GROWTH OF THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY?

TYPES OF SUSTAINABLE CONSUMERS

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THE FOLLOWERS
Sustainability is a priority, and they do their part in supporting sustainable brands. They rely on brands to help them achieve their sustainability goals. More likely to be older - Gen Z and younger millennials

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THE INACTIVES
Sustainability is not a strong driver and are unlikely to take action to support it. Barriers include price point or lack of intention. This consumer could still be influenced in the future.

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THE FRONTRUNNERS
The  sustainability rule makers. They are strong proponents of acting sustainably and believe they can influence the wider community. Their action gap is the shortest and tend to be older millennials.

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THE PASSIVES
Sustainability is important to this user but less likely to act on purchases due to price and lack of understanding. This consumer is most likely to be older Gen X, and Boomers.

TRASH TALK CONSUMER

THE MOVERS

Urban Areas | 22 -35 | 65-80k

ABOUT

The Mover manages a 9-to-5 work routine while embracing an on-the-go lifestyle, consistently prioritizing environmental considerations in their purchasing decisions. Their openness to change and feedback highlights their proactive stance in driving sustainable shifts in the industry.

MOTIVATIONS / VALUES

The Movers prioritize distinctive experiences, transparency, and sustainability. Driven by environmental responsibility and ethical values, they actively influence businesses and policies for a better world.

PAIN POINTS

- Companies lack transparency about their products' environmental and social impact, making it difficult for them to make informed choices

- Greenwashing

- Price point is a barrier for sustainable consumers, who face the challenge of balancing their eco-conscious values with their budget limitations.

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THE MOVERS

THE MOVERS ARE LEADING SHIFTS WITHIN THE INDUSTRY.

CONSUMER MOOD BOARD

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OPPORTUNITY

“Consumer demand for upcycled, recycled and reworked items are on the rise. This indicates these design processes tap into Gen Zʼs growing desire for individuality and sustainable consumption. In order to keep up with consumer trends and the need to decarbonize, you must incorporate processes that reuse or extend the life of existing materials.” – Helen Palmer, Head of Materials, Knit & Textiles, WGSN

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ADVANCING CIRCULAR SYSTEMS / CTQ'S

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Gaining insight into the product life cycle and identifying gaps within this framework to explore ways to support a more circular system

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DURABILITY

By using durable materials and construction techniques this extending garment lifespan, reducing waste and resource consumption, providing better value to consumers.

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VERSATILE

With timeless design and neutral colors, each piece is crafted for versatility, allowing individuals to effortlessly create various outfits and styles using a minimal number of items. Promoting practicality and reduces the need for excess garments.

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ONE OF ONE

Each piece is one-of-a-kind by using scrap materials, ensuring each item is unique. The varied wear over time showcases individuality and allows individuals to express their personal style.

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TIMELESS

Inspired by timeless aesthetics, Trash Talk stays stylish and relevant, minimizing the need for frequent updates and reducing waste through thoughtful silhouette and fabric choices.

REPAIRS / MOVING FORWARD

With previous experience in repairs for both outdoor gear and apparel, attention is drawn to highlighted areas where seams tend to rip out. Improvement opportunities lie in seam construction, material type, stitch, and thread type.

SEAM CONSTRUCTION

To strengthen seam construction, using double stitching or chainstitch techniques can add durability.

MATERIALS

The collection is made up of denim and cotton textiles known for their durability, ensuring lasting quality in all garments.

THREAD TYPE

Selecting the appropriate thread is essential for ensuring seam durability. Recycled Poly threads are used due to their strength and resistance to abrasion.

STITCH TYPE

Implementing chainstitching at stress points enhances durability, offering flexibility and facilitating easy repairs for prolonged longevity.

MATERIAL PALETTE

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All materials were sourced at the Goodwill bins in SLC. While sourcing materials keeping the key features in mind to source fabric responsibly. 

100% Cotton Denim

 

75% Wool 25% Polyester Blend

 

100% Cotton Corduroy

 

Cotton / Poly Blend in Tan and Taupe

 

100% Cotton Jersey Knit

 

100% Cotton Herringbone

SKETCH DEVELOPMENT

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LINE PLAN

PROCESS

FINAL CONCEPTS

The reworked button up and short is created from secondhand denim and old pants. The notions for this piece were gifted by friends and from previous garments. The reused zipper, buttons, wide-legged design, and spacious pockets in both the top and bottom contribute to a timeless piece that can be kept for many years to come.

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40 hours to pattern, fit + sew. 

BUTTON UP TOP + SHORT

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ASYMMETRIC HENLEY + PANT

29 hours to pattern, fit + sew. 

The asymmetric henley and pants are constructed from repurposed existing pants and a cotton jersey dress. Notions sourced from previous garments or provided by friends enrich the narrative of reuse and community. Featuring spacious pockets and a relaxed, baggy fit, the outfit offers freedom of movement, accommodating the wearer's lifestyle with ease and versatility.

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The quilted top and skirt are created from a corduroy blanket and quilted seat cover, each piece showcases uniqueness. The button, sourced from an old sewing teacher, adds a nostalgic touch. Meanwhile, the skirt's notions, sourced from existing garments, speak to the ethos of repurposing. The harmonious blend of quilted fabric and corduroy material adds texture and enduring elegance that will stand the test of time.

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20 hours to pattern, fit + sew. 

QUILTED  TOP + SKIRT

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PETER PAN TOP + PANT

42 hours to pattern, fit + sew. 

The peter pan button-up and pants are crafted from a large roll of fabric discovered at the bins and repurposed old pants, each piece tells a unique story of transformation. Notions sourced from friends and previous garments add a personal touch and further highlight the ethos of reuse. The pants display fading from their previous life, serving as a tribute to their journey before being turned into something new. The top's emphasized Peter Pan collar adds a distinctive flair, infusing the piece with interest and shape.

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